Monday, May 21 at Kauffman Foundation Conference Center

7:45-8:15AM: Continental breakfast (Town Square Room)

8:15-8:30AM: Welcoming remarks (Town Square Room)

  • Wendy Guillies, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation President & CEO
  • Tony Luppino, on behalf of Barbara Bichelmeyer, UMKC Interim Chancellor & Provost

8:30-8:55AM: Kick-Off Address

  • Georgia Levenson Keohane, Professor of Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School and a Senior
    Fellow at New America

9:00AM-11:45AM: Workshops in three tracks in separate breakout rooms:

Evolution of Social Entrepreneurship (Brush Creek Room):

9:00-10:15AM: Observations on the Changing Faces of Social Entrepreneurship

Summary of content:

  • This session will explore innovations in the practice of social entrepreneurship since this annual Symposium started in 2013, and directions in which social entrepreneurship may be heading. The panel will address such questions as: How have new technologies and uses of social media facilitated or challenged the work of social entrepreneurs? How have combinations of storytelling, and lessons about relationships among the physical world, the digital world, and technology-enabled visioning of virtual worlds created new opportunities for social entrepreneurship? Have new forms of collaboration among institutions of government, architecture, art, design, education, engineering, health care, law, sciences, and other disciplines emerged as engines of social entrepreneurship in urban, rural, and currently disadvantaged communities? At the 50th anniversary of the publication of his Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth, what might Buckminster Fuller think about the last five years of progress in the practice of social entrepreneurship and suggest about its future?

Facilitator:

  • Mark Beam, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Bob Berkebile, BNIM
  • Ashley Hand, CityFi
  • Adrienne Haynes, SeedLaw
  • Chris Miller, The Mission Center L3C and UMSL
  • Joe Unger, World Building Media Lab at USC and Pigeon Hole Productions

10:30-11:45AM: Diverse Examples of Social Entrepreneurship in K.C. Region

Summary of content:

  • In this session, led by moderators experienced in providing mentorship and incubation assistance to social entrepreneurs, a panel founders of diverse examples of social enterprises in the Kansas City region will describe the planning, implementation, and growth of their ventures, and share lessons learned from their experiences.     

Facilitator:

  • Derrick Collins, InterServ
  • Cindy Laufer, UMKC

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Becky Gripp, The Tamale Kitchen
  • Lauranne Hess, Planet Play
  • Kelly Kearney, Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas
  • Natasha Kirsch, The Grooming Project

Social Entrepreneurship by Nonprofit Organizations Track (Paseo Room):

9:00-11:45AM: Funding and Financing: Options for Revenues and Support

Summary of content: 

  • Where might the money to drive your venture come from? Nonprofit social ventures have the potential to employ a variety of types of revenue and support for their business models, and each of the options has benefits, challenges, and demands associated with it.  This introductory level  session will identify and discuss the options that early stage nonprofit social ventures might choose to develop for their business models, with consideration of the characteristics, pros, and cons of each of the primary types.  Participants will consider the options and assess the relative merits of various options for the long-term sustainability of their ventures.

Facilitator:

Neighborhood-Centered Social Entrepreneurship Track (Troost Room)

9:00-10:15AM:  Development of a Social Impact Investing Vehicle: Jobs Bond Project

Summary of content:

  • In this session, the originator of a proposal for a program of investment in jobs-creating entrepreneurial ventures (the “Jobs Bond”), and representatives of a team working under a Kauffman Foundation grant on the development of Jobs Bond design and deployment mechanisms, will share information on their progress to date on the project, and the processes that have shaped that progress. The discussion will include details on a proposed customizable “terms sheet” that reflects design thinking based on gathering and studying input from the perspectives of entrepreneurs, investors, government, and social investing intermediaries, as well as identification of methods to address the many variables involved in planning for pilot deployment of the Jobs Bond in particular geographical areas and industries.

Facilitators:

  • Evan Absher, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
  • Tony Mendes, UMKC

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Ruben Alonso III, AltCap
  • Chuck Connely, UMKC
  • Georgia Levenson Keohane, Columbia Business School, New America
  • Gina Riekhof, Gilmore & Bell
  • Leslie Scott
  • Jacob Wagner, UMKC

10:30-11:45AM: Social Entrepreneurship in Housing Policy and Planning

Summary of Content:

  • The City of Kansas City, Missouri is in the process of developing a new comprehensive housing plan. The effort comes at a time of increasing discussion and concern across the city related to issues of housing affordability, stability, and quality, in addition to gentrification and residential racial segregation. How can the housing plan help address these issues? What policies should city councilmembers and housing agency officials be considering? How can tenants, organizers, and other housing advocates have an impact? What role is to be played by market-rate developers, social entrepreneurs and mission-driven nonprofits, lenders, and other financial intermediaries? How can interdisciplinary research and teaching at UMKC help inform the process? This panel of experts aims to shed light on these questions in a robust conversation that can help to map out a vision for how the planning process can improve housing outcomes across the city. Specific policies to be considered will include inclusionary zoning, impact fees, community land trusts, healthy homes initiatives, housing preservation tools, and much more. 

Facilitator:

  • Brandon Weiss, UMKC

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Dianne Cleaver, Urban Neighborhood Initiative
  • Michael Duffy, Legal Aid of Western Missouri
  • Tara Raghuveer, People’s Action Institute
  • Jennifer Tidwell, Neighborhoods and Housing Services Department, City of KCMO
  • Anne Williamson, UMKC

Noon-1:40PM: Lunch and Panel Presentation: Innovations in Social Impact Investing (Town Square)   

(Presentation will be from approximately 12:20 to 1:35PM):

Facilitator:

  • John Tyler, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Flynn Coleman, Founding Grunin Fellow, NYU/Grunin Center for Law and Social Entrepreneurship
  • Kathleen Garman, Smart Cities Coordinator for City of Seattle
  • Tom Light, Managing Director, Water.Equity

2:00-5:00PM: Workshops in three tracks in separate breakout rooms:

Evolution of Social Entrepreneurship Track (Brush Creek Room):

2:00-5:00PM: Legal Issues and Organizational Forms for Social Entrepreneurship (Download material)

THIS SESSION ELIGIBLE FOR 3.4 HOURS OF MISSOURI CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION CREDIT “; KANSAS PENDING”

Summary of content:

  • This workshop explores several key legal issues in choosing and implementing an organizational structure for a social venture. The discussion will include examination of various attributes of traditional for-profit, traditional non-profit, and recently emerging hybrid entities (including L3Cs and benefit corporations), and significant issues in tax and capital structure planning. Particular emphasis will be placed on considering the fiduciary duties of managers of entities with missions that include the pursuit of social benefits, addressing some popular misconceptions about hybrid entities and “program related investments,” discussing potential implications of recent federal tax legislation, and exploring policy debates.

Facilitator:

  • Tony Luppino, UMKC

Presenters:

  • Joan Heminway, University of Tennessee
  • Christopher Hoyt, UMKC
  • John Tyler, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Social Entrepreneurship by Nonprofit Organizations Track (Paseo Room):

2:00-5:00PM: Messaging and Marketing: Establishing a Presence (Download material)

Summary of content:

  • One of the imperatives confronting nonprofit social ventures, old and new alike, is to develop and sustain a distinct presence and brand in the communities and markets they intend to serve. This interactive introductory workshop will offer insights on the work of establishing and maintaining a brand identity for the social venture, including consideration of strategies and techniques for engaging with stakeholders and constituents of different generations. 

Facilitator:

  • Scott Helm, Associate Director, Midwest Center for Nonprofit Leadership at UMKC

Neighborhood-Centered Social Entrepreneurship Track (Troost Room)  

2:00-3:25PM: Social Entrepreneurship in Healthcare Policy and Planning

Summary of content:

  • It is evident from the work of many public health organizations that community wellness, particularly when aggregated in life expectancy distributions across a large metropolitan area, or a population-depleted rural area, is a complex and largely man-made system of systems. As an economic-ecology both welcome and perversely unwelcome outcomes are observed. Demographic variation, economic stability, education quality, social and community context, health and preventive care, and built environment conditions comprise the social determinants of health; each is a co-factor of the other; ultimately in either a health sustaining or life-shortening context into which a prospective newborn emerges. This session will articulate both identified and anticipatory needs for more integrative and inclusive endeavors that social entrepreneurship initiatives might explore. Consideration will be given to the challenges of “make/buy” policy and portfolio decisions (i.e. when to innovate local solutions from available relevant experience; and when to adopt good practice of successful programs in settings at a geographic and policy “distance” from local circumstances).

Facilitator:

  • William P Mullins, Kessler Institute, KC

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Starla Brennan, Metro Lutheran Ministries, Impact Wednesdays Program
  • Becky Johnston, Critical Point LLC
  • Tracie McClendon-Cole, Health Department of KCMO
  • Chris Miller, UMSL
  • Juliann Van Liew, Unified Government WYCO/KCK, Dept. of Public Health
  • Jessica Zieg, Central Avenue Betterment Association, Livable Neighborhoods

3:40-5:00PM: Creativity, Diversity and the Neighborhood Economy

Summary of content:

  • This session will highlight neighborhood-based enterprise by featuring business owners and entrepreneurs to share their community-driven approaches towards small-scale wealth-building while addressing community concerns in Kansas City. Small business development has changed radically in the past fifty years with the changing geographic conditions, transportation and growth of the network economy. Land use development and lending patterns in metropolitan areas like Kansas City often make local business development difficult while economic development policies favor large and mobile firms. This session will feature the voices of Kansas City entrepreneurs who have started new ventures in the city’s diverse neighborhoods, including the development of new markets to spur the reuse of urban spaces. The session will focus on the role of creative producers in the development of neighborhood and local economic development as well as the obstacles experienced in the growth of new business ventures.

Facilitators:

  • Dina Newman and Jacob Wagner, UMKC Center for Neighborhoods

Participants/Co-Learners:

  • Dre Taylor, Founder of Nile Valley Aquaponics, Males to Men Mentoring and The KC Urban Farm Coop
  • Ms. Jackie Hunter, Sew In Piece Alterations and Upholstery
  • Ms. Sonie Joi Thompson-Ruffin, African American Artists Collective
  • Neil Rudisill, Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council and Woodland City KC
  • Selena O’Neal, Charlotte Street Foundation